ClearCreekLandConservancy

history 1

On December 30, 1986, former CCLC President George “Rock” Pring accepted a generous donation from longtime local resident, Carla Swan Coleman, of the 240-acre Northwoodside Conservation Easement, which protects over a mile of the Beaver Brook Trail near the Lookout Mountain Nature Center. This generous donation, in partnership with the Trust…...

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Abundant Wildlife

Clear Creek Canyon is home to abundant wildlife and expansive ponderosa pine forests. A quick 30 minute drive from downtown Denver and you will experience the beauty if its backyard. In the spring and summer, meadows fill with gorgeous wildflowers. In the fall, changing leaves in aspen groves provide brilliant…...

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World-Class Recreation

The Clear Creek watershed stretches from Loveland Pass to Arvada and reaches from the heights of Mt. Bierstadt and Grey’s and Torrey’s Peaks to the River Walk in Golden. Easily accessible via I-70, Highway 40, and Highway 6, Clear Creek Canyon is visited by hundreds of thousands of visitors for world-class hiking, biking,…...

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Cultural and Environmental Legacy

Clear Creek Canyon is one of the last largely undeveloped canyon systems in the Front Range. It has a long history of cultural and environmental significance for the area. Working together with other local conservancies and open space organizations, Clear Creek Land Conservancy exists to protect the land of the Clear Creek watershed to protect…...

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Plants and Trees

The great variety of altitude, soil conditions, sun exposure, and moisture patterns in and along Clear Creek Canyon produce an impressive range of ecosystems from dry grassland slopes to dense, damp forest.  An abundant variety of wild flowers and vegetation can be seen, from spring’s first Pasque flowers to the…...

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Bison

Although bison do not roam at large in Clear Creek Canyon, the bison herd kept along I-70 (at exit 254) in Genesee Park has become one of the area’s important tourist attractions. In 1914, Denver acquired both bison and elk from the herds at Yellowstone Park, and Genesee Park took…...

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Fish

Brook Trout is the major sport fish in the canyon. It is exotic and more tolerant of metals than rainbow, cutthroat, and brown trout, but not a native species to Colorado. The biggest challenge to stream life is from toxic heavy metals leaching from upstream mine sources. Due to high…...

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Mountain Lions

Human encounters with mountain lions are on the rise.  Part of the problem is that deer and elk are becoming acclimatized to people, spending more time closer to people and, in turn, attracting lions to residential areas.  Mountain lions are a particular threat to pets and can be a risk…...

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Bighorn Sheep

Bighorn sheep are Colorado’s state mammal and were first transplanted to the area around the intersection of Highway 5 and 119.  They have been dispersing eastward, down the canyon.  It is common to see them along I-70 and Highway 40 past Idaho Springs, but we advise visitors not to stop along…...

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Elk and Deer

In addition to non-migratory elk found in the southern part of the study area, there is a large migratory herd that winters on the north benches.  These benches are primarily large, open, grassy areas that remain relatively free of snow. Deer and elk do not commonly come into the gorge…...

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